Tuesday, May 14FROM THE RIVER TO THE SEA, PALESTINE WILL BE FREE

Uzbekistan

China’s Belt and Road chugging along in Central Asia
Afghanistan, China, Pakistan & Kashmir, Uzbekistan

China’s Belt and Road chugging along in Central Asia

Greater regional connectivity is seen as crucial to long-term peace and stability in Afghanistan. By: MK BHADRAKUMAR The information war is so intense nowadays that unsung melodies are often more alluring than the sung ones. The lines from English poet Percy Bysshe Shelley’s famous ode To a Skylark come to mind: “In the broad day-light / Thou art unseen, but yet I hear thy shrill delight …”  Two events in the past couple of weeks indicated growing optimism about Afghanistan’s future. Both developments signify that the scaffolding for improved regional connectivity, economic development and governance is coming up, largely unreported.  Certainly, the three-day visit to Islamabad in early November by Uzbek National Security Adviser Lieutenant-General Vikt...
Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan’s New President Mirziyoyev Is Undoing Karimov’s Legacy

NOVANEWS Uzbekistan’s New President Mirziyoyev Is Undoing Karimov’s Legacy. Towards a Rapprochement with Moscow and Beijing? By Andrew Korybko Oriental Review   Featured image: Shavkat Mirziyoyev and Vladimir Putin at the funerals of late Uzbekistan president Islam Karimov, December 2016 Uzbekistan’s new leader has spent his first year in office undoing his predecessor’s legacy, implementing an Erdogan-like “Zero Problems With Neighbors” approach mixed with a Deng Xiaoping-inspired “economic opening” in order to turn his geostrategically positioned Central Asian state into a New Silk Road powerhouse. Shavkat Mirziyoyev was chosen by the Uzbekistani elite to replace long-running but suddenly deceased President Islam Karimov in early September 2016, with his appointment being l...
Uzbekistan

What Obama Doesn’t Want You To Know About Uzbekistan

NOVANEWS   Evan El-Amin Death is usually a sad event. The passing of a world leader, particularly one who brought stability to a tense part of the Muslim world for several decades, is typically cause for concern. The death of Uzbekistani president Islam Karimov is not typical. For the majority of the long-oppressed citizens of Uzbekistan, the end of one of the world’s bloodiest and most corrupt dictators — and, to our eternal shame, an American ally — is cause for joy and gleeful celebration. The SOB died 82 years too late. Except for the time Republican presidential candidate Ben Carsoncalled it “a small, insignificant state…Ubeki-beki-beki-beki-stan-stan,” the hell on earth created by Karimov doesn’t get much coverage in the news media. Few Americans could find this ...